Google+ Travel Hotspots In Thailand: December 2010

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Koh Samui Island

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Koh Samui Island: "Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Koh Samui Island: 'Ko Samui island of Surat Thani Province or often, simply Samui as it is referred to by loca..."

Bangkok, Thailand

suvarnabhumi airport

Grand Palace
Bangkok, Thailand
Floating Market
Bangkok is the capital, largest urban area and primary city of Thailand. Known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon. Krung Thep  meaning "city of angels" for short, it was a small trading post at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River during the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It came to the forefront of Siam when it was given the status as the capital city in 1768 after the burning of Ayutthaya. However, the current Rattanakosin Kingdom did not begin until 1782 when the capital was moved across the river by Rama I after the death of King Taksin. The Rattanakosin capital is now more formally called "Phra Nakhon", pertaining to the ancient boundaries in the metropolis' core and the name Bangkok now incorporates the urban build-up since the 18th century which has its own public administration and governor.

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Koh Samui Island

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: Koh Samui Island: "Ko Samui island of Surat Thani Province or often, simply Samui as it is referred to by locals, is an island off the eas..."

Koh Samui Island

Ko Samui island of Surat Thani Province  or often, simply Samui as it is referred to by locals, is an island off the east coast of the Kra Isthmus in Thailand, close to the mainland Surat Thani town. It is Thailand’s third largest island, with an area of 228.7 km2 and a population of over 50,000 (2008). It is rich with natural resources, white sandy beaches, coral reefs and coconut trees.
Ko Samui is located in the Gulf of Thailand, about 35 km northeast of Surat Thani town (9°N, 100°E). The island measures some 21 kilometres at its widest point, and 25 km at its longest. It is surrounded by about sixty other islands, which compose the Ang Thong Marine National Park (Mu Ko Ang Thong National Park) and include other tourist destinations (Ko Pha Ngan, Ko Tao and Ko Nang Yuan).
The island is roughly circular in shape, and is about 15 km across. The central part of the island is an almost uninhabitable mountain jungle, Khao Pom, peaking at 635 m. The various lowland areas are connected together by a single 51 km road, running mostly along the coast to encircle the bulk of the island.
The old capital is Nathon, on the southwest coast of the island. It remains the major port for fishing and inter-island transportation. Nathon is the seat of the regional government, and the true commercial hub of the Samui locals. It has a charming pace, and is almost small enough to walk everywhere. The old Chinese shop houses along the middle street whisper of an exotic history.
Each of Samui’s primary beaches is now also nominally considered as a small town, due to the number of hotels, restaurants and nightlife that have sprung up in recent years.



               

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: KO LAN ISLAND

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: KO LAN ISLAND: "Koh Lan Island Koh Lan (Lan Island) Only 7 kilometres off Pattaya shore, Koh Lan is the most visited island in Chonburi Province. It’s ..."

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: KO LAND ISLAND

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: KO LAND ISLAND: "Koh Lan Island Koh Lan (Lan Island) Only 7 kilometres off Pattaya shore, Koh Lan is the most visited island in Chonburi Province. It’s c..."

KO LAN ISLAND




Koh Lan Island


Koh Lan (Lan Island) Only 7 kilometres off Pattaya shore, Koh Lan is the most visited island in Chonburi Province. It’s conveniently accessible with regular ferry and speedboat leaving Balihai pier in south Pattaya as early as 8 o’clock. It’s the island of fun. Each beach offers a variety of activities from water sports to sunbathing.
Beaches in Koh Lan
Haad Ta Waen is the longest and most popular beach of Koh Lan. Located in the northwest of the island, this 750-metre-long beach has clear waters and white fine sand. The beach, which is popular among Asian tourists, is lined with colourful beach chairs, shops and restaurants. Located in the west of Koh Lan is Haad Tian. This scenic beach in the cove stretches 500 metres long and features some coral reefs. It is as popular as Haad Ta Waen with loads of sport activities and restaurants on the offer. Another beach near Haad Ta Waen is Haad Sungwal. It is a small beach, only around 150 metres long. Without any shops or restaurant in the area, the beach is quieter than Haad Ta Waen and good for sunbathing. For those who prefer basking in the sun in peace, Haad Samae and Haad Ta Yai may serve your purpose. The first beach, which is only 10 minute walk from Haad Tian, is relatively quiet with shops and restaurants dotting the area. Nestling on the northern tip of the island, the latter beach has fewer beach goers and only one beachside restaurant.



Travel Hotspots In Thailand: PHUKET ISLAND

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: PHUKET ISLAND: " MAP OF PHUKET ISLAND Located approximately 862 ..."

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: PHUKET ISLAND

Travel Hotspots In Thailand: PHUKET ISLAND: " MAP OF PHUKET ISLAND Located approximately 862 ..."

PHUKET ISLAND
























                  MAP OF PHUKET ISLAND



Located approximately 862 kilometers south of Bangkok is Phuket, Thailand's largest island, which is often dubbed as the pearl of the Andaman, or the pearl of the south. Its natural resources- rocky peninsular, limestone cliffs, white powdery beaches, tranquil broad bays and tropical in-land forests contribute to making it the South's wealthiest, busiest, most visited and most popular island and province.


Nestled in the tropical zone off the west coast of the southern part of Thailand in the Andaman Sea and the Indian Ocean, the province covers an area of approximately 543 square kilometers (excluding small islets). It is estimated that Phuket Province covers an area of approximately 590 square kilometers if its 39 other small islands are included. The islands total length, from north to south, is estimated at 48.7 kilometers and approximately 21.3 kilometers wide.
Phuket borders on Phang-nga Province to the north. The other 3 sides are encircled by the Andaman Sea the place where many of the best diving sites are located. The island is connected to Phang-nga Province by Sarasin Bridge and Thep Krasattri Bridge.
Staying on the island is easy, as there are only two seasons in a year the rainy season (May to October) and the hot season (November to April). Visitors are not recommended to travel to Phuket between September and October as they are the wettest months. The best period for a visit, however, is from November to February, when it is possible to see the clear blue sky, feel the fresh sea breeze and marvel at the crystal clear water while lying on powdery, palm-fringed beaches. Average temperatures ranges between 23°C and 33°C.
Phuket's topology is exceptional with 70 percent of its area covered with mountains which stretch from north to south and the remaining 30 percent being plains located in the central and eastern parts of the island. The island does not have any major rivers except for a total of 9 brooks and creeks.
Phuket is divided into 3 administrative counties namely Amphoe Muang, Amphoe Thalang and Amphoe Kathu.
Phuket has a lot more to offer its visitors other than its natural heritage sea, sand, sky, beach, forest, and world renowned diving sites. Sino-Portuguese architecture casts its spell delighting travelers to the city, while Phuket-style hospitality has never failed to impress visitors from all walks of life. In addition, accommodations ranging from world-class resorts to tropical-style bungalows have warmly catered to the different needs of travelers. For seafood lovers, there is a lot more to sample than just Phuket's famous lobster. Altogether, these characteristics have made Phuket a truly unique destination.
History of Phuket
Most geologists believe that the area known as Phuket today was once a cape that extended into the Andaman Sea. Geographical formations gradually changed the capes location, finally detaching it from the mainland.
A famous Greek philosopher, Claudius Ptolemy, was the first person who mentioned the cape in his book written in the year 157. The cape was locally referred to as Jung Ceylon, which was located between latitudes 6 N and 8 N (the present site of Phuket Island). Natives called the place Cha Lang, which evolved to Tha Lang the name of the main town to the north of the island.
As a perfect stopover sheltering traders from monsoons, Jung Ceylon welcomed merchants from India, Persia, Arabia, Burma, China and also Siam. During the 16th century, the island was also a popular trading port for tin with Portuguese, Dutch, English and French traders flocking to the island. This contributed to making the development of mining so unprecedented. Chinese businessmen and miners later migrated to Phuket and soon enjoyed thriving business wealth.
Apart from serving as a meeting point for traders from Europe, Central Asia and China, Phuket also attracted ambitious immigrants, especially those from Portugal and China, to work in the tin mines. With its colorful history, visitors admire the Sino-Portuguese style architecture in the city especially those buildings located along the Thalang and Yaowarat Roads.
Thalang town was surrounded by Burmese troops who invaded the coastal area in 1785. It was under the leadership of Chan, the widow of the governor, and her sister, Muk, who united local residents and successfully fought and drove the invaders out of Phuket. It took over 30 days for the defending troops of Phuket, under the command of Chan and Muk, to claim their victory. As a result of such heroic deeds, noble titles were granted to Chan and Muk as Thao Thep Krasattri and Thao Si Sunthon respectively. To honor them, a monument was established at Tha Ruea Intersection, 12 kilometers to the north of Phuket City in 1966. They are still highly respected by Phuket residents even today.
However, 24 years later, the Burmese succeeded in seizing Thalang causing many local residents to flee to Phang-nga and Krabi. In 1825, some of them returned to re-establish a town and established a rice farming community. On the other hand, the area to the south of the island (Phuket City today) was developed and became a tin trading center.
When Phuket was elevated to a town in 1850, it attracted more immigrants from Thalang and nearby communities. In 1894, Phuket was promoted to be a Monthon administrative unit under the supervision of the central administrative body (located in Bangkok).
In 1902, Phraya Ratsada Korsimbi, a Sino-Thai businessman who contributed to developing the modern city of Phuket was appointed Governor of Phuket. He also helped to improve the welfare of local residents and set up the market system in the countryside. In 1916, Phuket became a province.
The tin mining industry has gradually failed to generate economic growth in Phuket, especially after 1985 when the price of tin fell by half. However, with its natural resources, Phuket later emerged as a tourist destination with great potential. This polished pearl of the Andaman is truly a destination that provides visitors with memorable experiences.


The islands long history has shaped the distinctive Phuket of the present with its diverse ethnic groups, culture, architectural influence, and fine cuisine. With approximately 35 percent of the population being comprised of Thai-Muslims, it is possible to see an equal number of Wats (Thai temples) located next to Mosques.

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